Tag Archives: City of Calgary

Queer Film Saved Us

The Calgary Gay History Project’s Kevin Allen has created a historic poster exhibition for the City of Calgary’s Open Spaces program. Open Spaces began in 2009 and celebrates the diversity and quality of works by regional artists, with gallery windows on the Centre Street LRT platform: enlivening the Calgarian commuter experience.

The Fairy Tales Queer Film Festival premiered in Calgary on June 17, 1999, and has become a treasured annual event ever since. The LGBTQ2 Festival has a history of engaging talented local artists to design its festival posters. Over the years, Fairy Tales accumulated a backlog of visually iconic posters that served as both marketing vehicle and artwork. Queer Film Saved Us is a curated retrospective of those beautiful posters. They assert—on the walls, streets, and bulletin boards of Calgary—that queer people were here and always have been.

The 23rd Annual Fairy Tales Queer Film Festival, produced by the Calgary Queer Arts Society, is happening soon (online again this year): running from May 21 – 30, 2021.

Seeing ourselves represented on the big screen was alchemy and moved LGBTQ2 rights forward when public funding for queer cultural events was considered controversial. Festival organizers routinely got harassing phone calls and hateful mail but kept the event going—defiantly.

Fairy Tales posters would paper the streets every year at festival time, claiming space in our city. Queer Film Saved Us is a retrospective of those claims: stylized, beautiful and proud. Artists and graphic designers represented in this exhibition include Lisa Brawn, Glen Mielke and Toqueboy Studios.

Poster from the 5th Annual Festival created by Toqueboy Studios

We especially thank Heather Campbell, Public Art Consultant for the City of Calgary, who managed all of the administrative details for this exhibition. She is a delightful and enthusiastic collaborator.

{KA}

#BanConversionTherapy: a letter to the @cityofcalgary

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Office of the Councillors
City of Calgary
PO Box 2100, Station M
Calgary, AB  T2P 2M5

May 21, 2020

His Worship Mayor Naheed Nenshi
Calgary City Council and Administration:

We, the undersigned, applaud you for your brave and bold leadership shown on February 3rd, 2020, when you unanimously voted for our city’s administration to craft a bylaw to protect LGBTQ2SIA+ Calgarians from the unscientific, fraudulent, and harmful practices of “conversion therapy”.

On May 13th and 14th, at the SPC meeting on Community and Protective Services, our city’s administration delivered a rigorously tested bylaw that aligns with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and protects vulnerable individuals from the abuses of so-called “sexual orientation, gender identity, and expression change efforts”. This bylaw has been prepared in full consultation with all stakeholders, supported by expert researchers, lawyers, and administrators to create the strongest bylaw possible to protect Calgarians.

Any attempts to amend this bylaw create exemptions and loopholes that are not only unethical, they are dangerous. Any changes made to this bylaw will place people’s lives at risk, effectively nullifying an intended prohibition on this harmful practice.

We are writing you as a coalition of Calgary’s diverse Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Two-Spirit, Intersex, Asexual communities to implore you to stand up for our rights, and for the lives of those most vulnerable to this unethical practice.

The Bylaw doesn’t need to be changed. We don’t need to be changed.

On Monday, May 25th, you will be given the opportunity to fulfill your commitment to end conversion therapy in Calgary. Please approve this bylaw as written – without amendments, without exemptions, and with the full support of your belief in the strength, dignity, and humanity of our LGBTQ2SIA+ communities.

Sincerely,

Pam Rocker, Director
Affirming Connections

Ian Watt, Board President
Apollo, The Western Cup

Kevin Allen, Historian, Author & Research Lead
Calgary Gay History Project

Shawn Loo, Board President
Calgary Men’s Chorus

Paul Meunier, Board President
Calgary Outlink

Shone Thistle, Board President
Calgary Pride

James Demers, Executive Director
Calgary Queer Arts Society

Pam Krause, President & CEO
Centre for Sexuality

Safa Rahman, Member
El-Tawhid Juma Circle

Boban Stojanovic, LGBTQ+ Program Manager
Centre for Newcomers

Kelly Ernst, President
End of the Rainbow Foundation

Kay Orr, Board President
Fellowship of Alberta Bears

Keith Murray, Affirming Coordinator
Hillhurst United Church

Leslie Hill, Executive Director
HIV Community Link

Nina Tron, Board President
Imperial Sovereign Court of the Chinook Arch

Michelle Robinson, Sahtu Dene, Co-chair
MMIWG2S Calgary Committee

Jane Perry, Artistic Director
One Voice Chorus

Jarom Moriyama-Bondar, Co-founder
Pride in Business

Jonathon Lloyd, Board Secretary
Prime Timers Calgary

Donna Thorsten, Manager
Rainbow Elders Calgary

Lindsay Peace, Co-founder
Skipping Stone Foundation

Gordon Sombrowski, Advisory Committee
The Chinook Lesbian and Gay Endowment Fund

Floyd Visser, Executive Director
The SHARP Foundation

A coalition of LGBTQ2SIA+ serving organizations listed in alphabetical order by organization. This letter can also be found on Calgary Pride’s website here: www.calgarypride.ca/banning-conversion-therapy

Klippert Month – Week 3

Everett Klippert was born in Kindersley, Saskatchewan in 1926, the youngest of nine siblings. His family relocated to Calgary when he was just 2 years old. Sadly, Everett’s mother died in May 1933 from kidney disease.

Everett’s 20-year older sister Leah took it upon herself to look after her eight younger brothers. The family was evangelical Baptist, and Leah made sure that the family regularly attended services at the Crescent Heights Baptist Church. There were so many brothers in the Klippert family that they were able to form their own baseball team with their father, called “the Klippert Nine,” which was once featured in the Calgary Herald.

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Everett (middle back row) with his father and brothers: The Klippert Nine. Source: Klippert Family, Photographer Lorne Burkell.

Everett’s siblings were discomforted by the police’s revelation of his homosexuality, but they stood by him – particularly Leah – throughout his drawn-out troubles with the state.

In 1960, after Everett’s first arrest, the Klippert family paid $9000 in bail: an equivalent of $72,000 in today’s dollars. For the trial, the family also procured a supportive reference letter from their Church Reverend, J. E. Harris. Although found guilty and incarcerated in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Everett’s siblings made efforts to visit him in the Penitentiary.

Leah worked as a legal secretary in the offices of J. D. Salmon, Solicitor for the City of Calgary. It was she who kept writing Everett’s legal correspondence, engaging lawyers, and appealing his court verdicts as unjust: ultimately pushing his case to the Supreme Court. In early 1967, she along with her brother Howard trekked to the Court of Appeal Case in the Northwest Territories.

Howard Klippert was brought forward as a witness for the defence. In the trial, he said: “to the best of my knowledge Everett has been well liked and well received with my friends and family. He has always been noted for his gentleness and willingness to help others. I have never known him to be violent – never. On many occasions when going to school together, I have had to protect him from others who would start a fight with him.”

Everett would not be released from jail until 1971 and went to live with his brother William in Calgary. Phyllis, Everett’s sister-in-law, said: “He was the funniest person you ever met. He lived with us for 17 years. When he was around, there wasn’t any dark cloud anywhere. He was part of our family for years.” Despite his sunny character, she added that his years in jail had left Everett feeling stalked, and embittered.

Walter Klippert said he and his brothers never talked about their youngest sibling being gay, but “we knew he was out with boys a lot. See, he was a transit driver for the city. He was a popular driver, very happy go lucky. He was really nice to everybody, anybody.”

Eventually, Everett would move to Edmonton and marry his good friend Dorothy at age 57 (she was 65). He reportedly was happy and content in his final years of life, but both he and his family did not talk about the past. He died in 1996 at age 69.

Documentary filmmakers in 2001 interviewed several members of the Klippert family, including Everett’s widow. Most were resistant to the idea of a film. Dorothy said: “I don’t think it is right to bring up the past when you have no concrete way of knowing how he felt about it.”

Everett was buried next to his sister Leah at her daughter’s farm. While she was alive, Leah’s attitude was that she loved Everett, full stop. How could the fact that he was gay, ever change that?

{KA}