Tag Archives: Calgary Herald

Lois Szabo Commons Open!

Lois Szabo Commons officially opened yesterday, and although we could not be there, we hungrily read the press and social media accounts of the park’s launch. The honour is well-deserved.

Lois with friends and family at the Park’s dedication ceremony. Photo: Marlene Hielema via Facebook.

Lois told me she received so many hugs from the assembled crowd that it may have counteracted her pandemic’s hug deficit! She was particularly chuffed to get a hug from Mayor Naheed Nenshi (two of them apparently).

Here is a media round-up!

City of Calgary Press Release

CBC: Beltline park opens to honour Lois Szabo, Calgary LGBTQ leader

660 News: Lois Szabo Commons opens, recognizes prominent leader in Calgary’s LGBTQ2S+ community

Global News: New Beltline community space named after Calgary LGBTQ2S+ leader opens

Calgary Sun: New Beltline park commemorates LGBTQ2S+ community leader Lois Szabo

Calgary Herald: New park in the Beltline commemorates local LGBTQ2S+ community leader Lois Szabo

Although the media accounts are similar, they each have a different photo of Lois! {My favourite is the Calgary Herald’s below}

Congratulations Lois and thank you City of Calgary!

{KA}

A virus-free club in YYCgayhistory?

{The Calgary Gay History Project has hunkered down at home, doing our part for social distancing in Canada. As a distraction, we’re diving deep into local AIDS history over the next few weeks to explore how Calgarians reacted to this earlier pandemic.}

In May 1987, four years after the first case of HIV was diagnosed in Calgary, local entrepreneurs Ross Anderson and Terry Daley attempted to start an AIDS-free private club. An initial advertisement received interest from more than 300 Calgarians who wanted to join.

The club concept included dining and dancing areas, a night club and a gym. To join, people would pay $300 and need to have two tests for the virus, one when they applied and the next one eight weeks later. There was also an ongoing testing schedule proposed, which was never finalized.

Doug Morin, the executive director of AIDS Calgary, disapproved. He explained that people who join the club might be at a higher risk of catching the disease than people who don’t.

“It spreads like wildfire when everyone assumes he’s OK. It’s so scary when people stick their heads in the sand, and don’t worry about it. The test is only good for the day it’s taken,” Morin added.

AIDS Vigil Calgary 1987

Calgary AIDS Vigil, March 22, 1987. Photo: David Lazarowych, Calgary Herald

Anderson, in an interview in the Calgary Herald, said he did not know exactly when the club would open or where it would be.

“The fear of AIDS affects everybody. People like yourself and myself are inhibited about making contact. We want to provide a situation so [people] can act normally,” Anderson clarified. He mused that setting up the club would not be easy, and they would not be able to provide absolute health guarantees to clubgoers.

At the time, 33 people had been diagnosed with AIDS in Calgary.

{KA}

Self-isolating? Free Book!

Dear Calgary Gay History Supporters,

It is distressing to find our world so disrupted by pandemic. With social distancing and closing borders, we will likely find ourselves with much more time at home. Reading has always been a favourite pastime and retreat for me. Now that we may find bookstores and libraries closed, it occurred to us, that we could assist our fellow Calgarians by providing free PDF downloads of Our Past Matters: Stories of Gay Calgary.

The book, which was on the Calgary Herald’s local best-seller list in 2019, explores our city’s LGBTQ2 past. In it, you will find stories of resiliency and courage, darkness and light. Until April 30, 2020, email Kevin at calgarygayhistory@gmail.com with the subject line: “PDF please” and we will send you a copy.

Our Past Matters EBook Cover

Write “PDF Please” for a free copy!

Calgarians have a long tradition of taking care of each other. This was perfectly illustrated a few days ago by Sam Hester’s Pulling Together-Even as We Move Apart in the Sprawl.

Please take care and give support, as you are able, to our self-isolating elders, who often are the keepers of our stories.

To a hopeful future!

{KA}