Tag Archives: Bathhouse

Goliath’s Raid Research

Calgary Gay History Project volunteer Sheldon Cannon is busy this summer researching the Goliath’s Bathhouse Raid by Calgary Police. This raid was notable in Canadian Queer History due to its timing: December 12, 2002—more than 20 years later than many similar raids in other Canadian cities. The raid was specifically referenced in the Calgary Police’s apology to the LGBTQ2 community in 2018.

Newspaper clipping from the Calgary Herald, March 1, 2003

Sheldon is interviewing activists, people who were arrested in the raid, and the Calgary Police to get a fulsome view of this pivotal moment in Calgary’s queer history. If you have a story you would like to share about the raid please contact us. We hope to present this research during this year’s Calgary Pride festival at the end of August.

{KA}

The Pisces Bathhouse Raid @ 40

We just passed the 40th anniversary of the Pisces Bathhouse Raid in Edmonton on May 30, 1981.

Queer historian and esteemed colleague, Darrin Hagen, has plumbed this history extensively. For the anniversary, he has written a five-part series for the Edmonton City as Museum Project and produced a video titled: PISCES for Theatre Network.

Court Sketch
Court sketch. Image courtesy of Darrin Hagen.

PISCES reveals some never-before seen details of the undercover investigation, the actual raid, and the aftermath of the largest mass arrest in Edmonton’s history. These actual documents are read by young members of Edmonton’s Queer arts community. It also feature first-hand recollections from one of the only men arrested that night to ever speak on the record about the raid, Edmonton Queer icon Michael Phair.” —TheatreNetwork.ca

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Front page news that summer in the Body Politic

One of the most striking details in the sting operation was how methodical and intense it was. In February 1981, the Edmonton Police Service started sending pairs of young undercover police detectives to pose as members of the Pisces Spa. In total, there were nine officers who spent weekend nights mingling, watching, and making copious, detailed notes concerning the activities of the men who gathered there for the purpose of sex.

Darrin’s work is riveting and recounts an important flashpoint in our human rights struggle in Alberta. Looking for a Calgary connection, Darrin told us: “so far we have not discovered any Calgarians in the list of found-ins but after a year, we still don’t have all the names. Navigating the process or getting info is a whole separate story, and it’s far from over.”

Queer history fades without champions; we thank Darrin for this consequential work.

{KA}