Tag Archives: Everett Klippert

More Tea and HiR developments

As Historian in Residence at the New Central Library, I serve tea weekly (weakly?) on Thursdays from 5-6 PM in room 414-A on the 4th floor. Last night we had Lois Szabo discuss the origins of Club Carousel, Calgary’s first gay bar. Lois was one of the club’s founders in the late ’60s and has been an active member of the community ever since. She was chosen to be our Pride Parade Marshall in 2017.

Lois in Herald

Lois Szabo at the 2017 Pride Parade: Calgary Herald Photo

Next week, on Thursday, December 20th, we have local representatives from the el-Tawhid Juma Circle, Calgary’s inclusive mosque space also known as Unity Mosque. The queer affirming mosque space was founded in Toronto almost ten years ago and has since spread to other Canadian cities. Their mission is to be compassionate, inclusive, gender equal and LGBTQ affirming. Please join us for tea!

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El-Tawhid Juma Circle Website

The library residency has proved to be very fruitful for research. I have been combing the pamphlet and clipping files in the library in the new Calgary’s Story section on the 4th floor.

For example, I discovered the story of Mark Perry-Schaub who was diagnosed with AIDS in July 1987 and subsequently lost his volunteer job with the Calgary ’88 Olympics Committee. He had been a volunteering for three years prior to the diagnosis and fought publicly to be reinstated. He was successful in his fight and despite struggling with three successive bouts of pneumonia he was strong enough to work throughout the Games. He died two months later.

This week I met with three nieces of Everett Klippert whom I had not interviewed before. They shared stories of their Uncle Evie which were new to me, including a wedding with a woman whom he ran away from – the day before the wedding!

Last week, I interviewed Joey Sayer, who was instrumental in founding Lesbian and Gay Youth Calgary (LGYC) in the ’80s, as well as significant gay publications Modern Pink, and Alberta Gay & Lesbian Press (AGLP). Oral history interviews like these, are key sources for future stories on the Calgary Gay History Project website.

Joey Sayer
Kevin and Joey at the Historian In Residence Studio at the New Central Library

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Spotlight on YYC Gay History

It is with some excitement that we announce the Calgary Gay History Project getting a public profile boost this Autumn.

The short film, GROSS INDECENCY: THE EVERETT KLIPPERT STORYwe produced with director Laura O’Grady and Spotlight Productions, has been accepted into the Calgary International Film Festival (which opens tonight). It is screening three times, on September 22, 24, and 30. The latter being the “Best of Shorts” program at the festival – we are very honoured.

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Click the caption to watch the film on YouTube

Kevin Allen has been invited to be the very first Historian in Residence at the new Central Library opening downtown on November 1, 2018. It is a three-month community engagement residency that supports individual historians and researchers working in any genre related to Calgary’s social, cultural and built history.

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The New Central Library

Kevin will be working in a bright, designated office space on the fourth floor of the new Central Library and will engage with the public through programs such as open office hours, interactive workshops, and lectures.

As part of the residency, Kevin will curate an exhibit at the Library which will be displayed in May 2019. The residency program is a partnership between the Calgary Public Library and the Calgary Heritage Authority.

If any Calgary Gay History Project readers have programming ideas for the residency, please email Kevin at calgarygayhistory@gmail.com.

Enjoy the fall colours!

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An ode to one particular mother

{We want to give a shout out to the tremendous queer culture coming to Calgary this month: the Unison LGBTQ2 Choir Festival, May 18-21; and Fairy Tales “Twenty,” May 25 – June 2!}

When we started the Calgary Gay History Project in 2012, we had no idea the journey it would take us on. Currently, we are working with filmmaker Laura O’Grady from Spotlight Productions on a short film about the life of Everett Klippert. This week, we travelled with cinematographer Patrick McLaughlin, to Everett’s niece Katherine’s farm, three hours from Calgary. Everett requested to be buried here next to his beloved sister Leah (also Katherine’s mom): stalwart defender of Everett in his protracted tangle with the Canadian state.

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Everett Klippert’s headstone. He is buried next to his sister Leah and brother-in-law David.

It was Leah, a legal secretary in Calgary, who fought Everett’s unjust incarceration and categorization as a dangerous sexual offender.

It was Leah, who gathered the resources and expertise to challenge court decisions, pushing Klippert’s case forward to the Supreme Court.

It was Leah, who travelled to the Northwest Territories to support him at trial, and who visited him regularly in the Prince Albert Penitentiary.

It was Leah, 20 years older than Everett, who acted as a mother to Everett when they lost their mother to kidney disease in 1933. Everett was then six years old.

So on this Mother’s Day Weekend, we would propose a toast to Leah, mother to many, and mother to a better world for Canada’s LGBTQ2 community.

Klippert Family Photos 1940s

Klippert family photo: Front row: Merton Klippert (Everett’s father), Everett and Leah. Back row: Everett’s seven older brothers!

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